Category Archives: Treatment

Physical Therapy to Prevent Falls in the Elderly

falls

Did you know that 1 in 3 adults over age 65 has a fall in a given year?’ Not only can falls cause serious injuries, but they can cause older adults to become less active due to fear of falling and this can affect their long­term health. The fear of falling can also prevent older adults from being able to respond appropriately to prevent falls when they lose their balance. Balance can be affected by multiple factors including medications and health conditions as well as the person’s posture, strength deficits, gait deficits and balance disorders.

The therapists at Accelerate Physical Therapy can help older adults who are at risk for falls. We provide a full assessment of gait, balance, posture and strength and then develop a treatment plan based on the client’s individual needs. Therapeutic exercise to address balance deficiencies can be highly beneficial to increase the client’s confidence and ability to respond to balance challenges. Gait training can prevent falls by improving foot clearance and dynamic stability. Increasing strength and postural control allows the client to improve reactions and tolerance to regular activity.

Anoslipfallther aspect of fall prevention is discussing home safety habits. Our physical therapy evaluation will also include a. discussion of client’s home environment and their ability to perform daily activities safely. We will educate clients in fall prevention at home through good safety practices and the use of appropriate assistive devices.

Physical therapy is an excellent resource to prevent falls in any clients who have experienced falls or are reporting difficulty with their balance, and for those with chronic health conditions causing weakness or unsteady gait. We look forward to teaming up with our referring physicians to prevent falls in older adults, veterans and the actively challenged.

Home Treatment for Bulging Discs

Accelerate Physical Therapy in Arvada, Colorado teaches you to relieve back and radiating leg pain. These exercises provide decompression of the lumbar spine, and are a great treatment for bulging discs.

Here are two great ways to relieve pain for which many face expensive medical treatments.  Save thousands of dollars and health risks from injections of steroids, narcotics, decompression, traction, chiropractic, and even physical therapy.  Watch and try these two techniques at home.

Rocking gives an oscillating stretch,  controlling the intensity experienced.  Perform these techniques for just a few minutes, or up to twenty minutes, as often as you need relief.

If you need help understanding these techniques, call Paul O’Brian, PT, CSCS, at Accelerate Physical Therapy, PC in Arvada, Colorado. Our office number is (303) 421-2210.

Four Exercises for Knee Pain

The following 4 exercises will help you soothe the pain in the knees quickly:

Bent-Leg Raises
You should start in a sitting position. Extend one leg in front of you and elevate it to be parallel to the ground. Hold for a minute, and then bend the knee to lower the leg halfway to the ground. Hold for half a minute, and return to the starting position. Make 4 repetitions, and switch legs.

Half-Kneel Hip and Quad Stretch
Place a mat on the ground, kneel on the right knee, and put the left foot in front of you. Stretch the hip downward by leaning forward to the left knee. Then, lift the back ankle toward the hip to stretch the hamstrings, and switch legs. Make 15 repetitions.

Knee Flexion
Sit on a chair, with the feet in front of you. Then, take a towel and loop it under the foot while resting on the floor, and pull on the towel slowly until the foot is about 4-5 inches above the ground, and the knee is bent. Switch legs and do 5 repetitions.

Wall Calf Stretch
Lean against a wall, standing, and rest one foot on the wall, and the other on the ground. Lean forward to stretch the calf, and hold for 5-10 seconds, and then release. Change the leg and perform the same 10-15 times.

If you perform some of these exercises on a daily basis, you will effectively treat and prevent knee pain.

Source: www.healthandlovepage.com

Tensor Fascia Latae Pain

Reference from: http://www.newhealthadvisor.com/Tensor-Fasciae-Latae-Pain.html

The Tensor Fasciae Latae is a muscle, which helps in flexing and abducting the thigh. It becomes very vital for a runner due to this function. If the TFL is consciously kept flexible, it will help in keeping the body injury free as well as being fit. Activities like walking, bending and moving around can get affected if the muscles of the thighs and hip are injured. They will also affect exercise pattern. Tensor fasciae latae pain can be caused due to a tear or strain in the muscle. With proper directed exercise, the muscle can be healed and strengthened.

What Are the Symptoms?

The symptoms include:

  • Pain in the outer hip
  • Referred pain down the outer thigh
  • Pain when lying on the affected hip
  • When weight bearing on the affected side, the pain worsens

The trigger points for TFL myofascial can get misdiagnosed as trochanteric bursitis because they have very similar symptoms. In the beginning the treatment for either case should be to get the surrounding muscles in good condition and make corrections in existing imbalance in the muscles. If the case persists, it should be investigated for bursa involvement.

What Causes Tensor Fasciae Latae Pain?

Tensor fasciae latae and Iliotibial band muscle pain can be caused due to the following activities:

Running, climbing, cycling, dancing, excessive walking when not in shape and playing court sports like basketball, volleyball and tennis.

How to Relieve Tensor Fasciae Latae Pain

Therapies

  • Warm and Cold Therapy Gel: A pain relieving gel, which provides therapeutic warmth with burning, can be used. Or else a cooling gel, which reduces inflammation by cooling the area. The gel should be applied on the outside of thighs and knees. It will help in reducing the tensor fasciae latae pain as well as tightness.
  • Hot and Cold Compress/Wrap: This kind of wraps can be used on thighs, knee, hip and back. It can be cooled in the freezer or heated in the microwave. It helps in reducing the pain and swelling in the injured muscle by cold therapy and chronic pain and swelling by warm therapy.
  • Tensor Fasciae Latae Brace and Support: This brace is useful in providing compression and support to the TLF muscle. This type of support can be used in high thigh and groin injuries as well. The brace is held in place by wrapping around thigh and abdomen.
  • Compression Leggings: Compression leggings are usually used for preventing injuries, however, they are excellent when used as support for injured muscle. They help in reducing swelling as well. Good compression leggings cover the thighs and end below the knee. Tight compression at lower end of limb and decreased compression at top is essential for reducing inflammation and circulation.  
  • Massage Tools for Self Treatment: A roller is an excellent massage tool, which can be used on upper and lower leg muscles. It is easy to use and helps in relieving tension and pain. It just needs to be rolled up and down the muscle and usually does not strain the hands and wrists.

Stretching and Strengthening Exercise for Tensor Fasciae Latae Pain

Some exercises are described below which help in strengthening the muscles and dealing with the tensor fasciae latae pain.

  • Outer Hip Stretch

Start by lying down on the back, and bend your right knee. Cross the bent leg over the left knee and pull with your left hand. Hold this position for 10 to 30 seconds. This exercise stretches the gluteus medius, gluteus minimus and tensor fascia latae muscles.

  • Standing Outer Hip Stretch

Start by placing the leg to be stretched behind the other leg. Lean your body on the side, which is not going to be stretched. The hip to be stretched should be pushed out to the other side. Hold for 10 – 30 seconds. The muscles stretched in the exercise are TFL, Iliotibial band and Sartorius.

  • Hip Abduction with Band

This exercise is done to strengthen the hip abductors present on the outside of the joint. To start wrap a resistance band around the ankle and other end to a doorway or chair leg. Stretch the leg outside, as far as possible and slowly come back to position. Muscles stretched in this exercise are TFL, Gluteus medius and gluteus minimus.

  • TFL Trigger Pointing

A trained person should help you in this exercise. A massage ball is laid on the bad side, under the TFL and moved around. It helps in identifying the painful or sensitive spot. The pressure is maintained for 10 – 15 seconds till the tenderness decreases. It should be done twice in the beginning, and repeated every 2-3 hours.

  • Squatting Exercise

Squats are helpful in strengthening the TFL muscle and also in increasing the hip rotation and flexion. To start stand with the feet at shoulder distance, keep the back straight and abdominal muscles pulled in. Bend your knees while pushing the butt out, till your thighs are parallel to the floor. Push upwards from the heels and stand straight. This can be done 5 to 10 times.

Watch this video to learn how to stretch TFL (tensor fascia latae) the right way.

Wear Arch Supports!

Because most individuals’ arches collapse in our shoes, we commonly advise our clients wear supplemental supports in their footwear.  Orthotics, or at least foam arch supports have been repeatedly effective in curing pain and mechanical dysfunction.Adding height to the navicular bone at the medial arch of our feet changes it’s functional position, as well as the knee and hip.  These supports dramatically prevents many common problems. Gradually, as the body adjusts to corrective changes, stresses change and the resultant pain subsides.  The problem will continue or return if left uncorrected.

Wear arch supports if you are standing, exercising, shopping, working and always at home.  A number of products are available in stores near you.  Relatively inexpensive arch supports ($20-50) are available at a variety of stores near you.

Everyone should wear supplemental arch supports in their shoes, slippers, athletic footwear, training shoes and cleats.  Orthotics, or at least foam arch supports have been repeatedly effective in curing pain and dysfunction of foot, ankle, knee, hip and back.

Arch supports reduce the degree of:

  • Flat feet or falling arches (pes planus)
  • Foot pronation
  • Ankle eversion
  • Q angles at the knee (valgus)
  • Uneven hips (pelvic obliquity)
  • Lumbar scoliosis.

Supporting the medial arch changes the functional position of the foot, knee and hip.  Residual pain can take a few weeks to go away, but the problem will not get better if left uncorrected.  Leg and back pain sufferers benefit from supplemental arch supports and orthotics. Even if you only stand all day, arch supports will control pain and manage many progressive problems that we commonly treat.

skeletons

Contrast Baths – DO Try This at Home!

Contrast baths reduce swelling and aids recovery from painful lactic acid buildup caused by excessive exercise.  At Accelerate Physical Therapy, we have developed an application of this technique that is easy to apply at home, and surprisingly effective in comparison to (an in addition to) every other modality we use clinically.  We use it extensively for ankle, foot, elbow and hand conditions to reduce edema (swelling), effusion (excessive joint fluid), pain and ecchymosis (bruising).

Try this (very inexpensive treatment) at home:

Fill up two basins or buckets – one hot and one cold – with water from your faucets.  Soak the effected part in cold water (preferably first and last) for 2-3 minutes, then alternate 2-3 minutes in hot water, 2-3 minutes cold, 2-3 minutes hot water, and finally 2-3 more minutes cold – for a total of  10-15 minutes of treatment.

Two dishpans are easy to find in many stores for less than 5 dollars each. Fill one with cold water and one with hot water from your kitchen faucet.

The use of heat immediately after an injury may cause MORE bruising and swelling.  Therefore, do not use HOT water until 2-3 days after the injury.

Hot water causes vasodilation (widening) of the blood vessels.  Cold water causes vasoconstriction (active narrowing) of the blood vessels.  Alternating this response is therapeutic, and is effectively manipulated by the change of temperatures.  Opening the blood vessels when the injury is fresh will cause more blood to be spilled between tissues.  This blood causes the bruising seen (and not seen).  The less blood and protein substances that are released, the shorter the recovery time will be.  The more bleeding and therefore bruising, the more painful it can be, and the slower the recovery will be.  Use cold treatment, compression, elevation and apply Arnica Montana gel to the skin over the injury to treat the injury for the first 2-3 days.

Sprains, tendonitis, epicondylitis, contusions, and painful nerve conditions all have benefited from Contrast Baths here at Accelerate Physical Therapy, PC.  We strongly suggest that people use it to improve conditions that otherwise be slower to resolve.

Exercise is a Cure!

Accelerate PTExercise is prescribed to assist healing from surgeries, injuries and chronic pain. At every stage, exercise activities aid in your recovery.

Here are some exercise benefits:

· Improve strength and restore range of motion.
· Stimulate soft tissue healing.
· Reduce inflammatory conditions.
· Improve body awareness.
· Reduce pain in joints because muscle balance improves the ability to move correctly. Reduce joint friction, stress and instability in dynamic activities.
· Stimulate bone strength in less active individuals.
· Bowel and bladder functions are enhanced by exercise.
· Improve circulation, reduce swelling in extremities.
· Prevent and reverse atrophy of the muscles.
· Decrease muscle spasms and back pain.
· Improve posture and associated soft tissue pain.
· Heal tendonitis and epicondylitis.
· Adapt support for longer, unloaded training.
· Aquatic exercise allows higher repetitions for accelerated return to athletics.
· Achieve wellness milestones with exercise.

Conditioning programs help physical therapists accomplish faster and more complete recovery with our clients. Evaluation and treatment by a licensed physical therapist can identify muscle imbalance and tightness that, with treatment can resolve problems and prevent a re-injury. A therapist will create a personalized treatment plan for the restoration of your active lifestyle.

Shoulder Impingement

What is Shoulder Impingement?

Impingement refers to mechanical compression and/or wear of the rotator cuff tendons. The rotator cuff is actually a series of four muscles connecting the scapula (shoulder blade) to the humeral head (upper part of the shoulder joint.) The rotator cuff is important in maintaining the humeral head within the glenoid (socket) during normal shoulder function and also contributes to shoulder strength during activity. Normally, the rotator cuff glides smoothly between the undersurface of the acromion and the humeral head.

How is Shoulder Impingement Treated?

The first step in treating shoulder impingement is eliminating any identifiable cause or contributing factor. This may mean temporarily avoiding activities like tennis, pitching or swimming. A The mainstay of treatment involves exercises to restore normal flexibility and strength to the shoulder girdle, including strengthening both the rotator cuff muscles and the muscles responsible for normal movement of the shoulder blade. This program of instruction and exercise demonstration may be initiated and carried out either by the doctor or a skilled physical therapist.

Source: American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine