Tag Archives: strength

The Benefits of Therapeutic Exercise

Increases size and strength in musculotendinous tissue and tensile strength
Improves coordination and timing of muscular groups
Reduces atrophy
Improves reaction, recruitment and endurance
Improve cardiovascular fitness
Reduces edema
Improves connective tissue strength and integrity
Promotes circulation to enhance soft tissue healing/metabolism
Increases bone density
Increases endurance, reduces fatigue
Improve range of motion of the spine and extremities
Improves postural balance
Improves joint function

How Can I Prevent My Shoulder From Dislocating Again?

Dislocating a shoulder is a traumatic experience. After having it put back in place (or like Mel Gibson, you smack your shoulder into a wall), there is a good chance you will have some questions about what happens next.

After a short period of time in a sling, you will progress to exercises like pulleys, wall climbing for range of motion; and closed grip pull downs, rowing on a machine and shrugs, for shoulder blade strength.

Patients can compensate for loose ligaments by increasing the strength and control of the rotator cuff and shoulder blade muscles. These muscle groups help pull the ball (humeral head) into the shoulder socket (glenoid) and will pull more tightly if they are strong.

Strengthening programs for the rotator cuff include rotation exercises as shown:

Shoulder RTC Ex

Low, or even no resistance, high repetition exercises can teach and rehabilitate the shoulder all it needs to know for a while. It may take 4 months to feel completely normal again.

Exercises that increase coordination of the shoulder are also important. Contact your physical therapist to learn exercises specific to YOUR needs.

Call Paul O’Brian, PT, CSCS at Accelerate Physical Therapy, P.C. in Arvada, Colorado. (303) 421-2210

Exercise/Jog/Run Off Your Heels

Nearly 75%  of runners land on their heels. Joggers, runners, even walkers should not to land on their heels with great impact.  To prevent shin splints, ankle, knee, hip and back pain, all field athletes should try to land on the midfoot and avoid heel striking, especially in football, baseball and softball. In more enduring athletic efforts like soccer, rugby and distance running, landing on the flat foot, minimizing the intensity of heel contact protects the leg from destructive and compressive joint impact.  Players are victims of over striding. The angle of heel strike may be the physics problem we must solve.

Recent discussion suggests the need for firmer soles, based on the premise that running shoes offer too much cushion.  Changing your running style to foot flat or forward on the foot may take concentration, but improves the whole leg’s ability to absorb shock.  If you exercise on a treadmill, elevate the incline 5% to easily learn this technique, and perhaps instantly reduce your pain.

When you land on your heels, you are decelerating, or braking. Stay off your heels, and avoid slapping your feet. To run faster, lean forward, leading with your chin, holding your spine straight with core muscles. This puts the center of gravity in front of the planted, or stance leg. The more you lean, the faster you MUST move.run off your heels

Learning to run is well managed by speed coaches who help teach athletes to recognize inefficient running in others and to take responsibility for their own peculiarities. Some people say you can’t coach speed, but athletes with talent and horrible techniques are prime arguments to the contrary. Becoming stronger while the season progresses (with speed training and progressive weight training) are the key elements of our most famous success stories.